In my last post on conservation land development, I discussed a cost concept—negative externalities.[1]  In this post, I cover a benefit concept—ecosystem services.

Third Key Term: Ecosystem Services

The third conservation land development term a legal professional should master—ecosystem services—is a dual ecology and economic concept.

Ecosystems are defined as a dynamic complex of

Residential land development provides many economic and social benefits to society. Most economic costs are factored into and paid by residential land developers (as the producer of the economic good) during the residential land development process. However, residential land development also comes with costs to the ecosystems on which it is built that are not

The first conservation land development term a legal professional should grasp is an economic one: market failure.

The Importance of Conservation Land Development Terminology

Fully grasping conservation land development terminology, such as market failure, starts with the context in which conservation land development principles are applied: the economy. The economic marketplace and government are society’s

As an interdisciplinary specialty, conservation land development requires integrating knowledge and methods from different disciplines and then harmonizing links between the disciplines into a coordinated and coherent whole.  Among those disciplines, ecology and economic principles unconsciously can be minimized during the crafting and implementation of conservation land development projects, in favor of an overemphasis on-site

Unlike a Rose By Any Other Name, Conservation Development Does Not Always Smell Sweet.

One of conservation development advocates’ core claims is that utilization of the land development technique results in a more environmentally-friendly finished product when compared to conventional land development techniques.  Such a claim is typically true.  It is true because conventional development

A Recent USC Lusk Perspectives Online Discussion

On July 14, 2020, the weekly Lusk Perspectives hosted an online discussion that, likely unbeknownst to the presenter, provided indirect but sound support for my newfound professional conviction.  This conviction is that there is growing consumer demand for residential homes at the exurban fringe built according to real